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LS vs. LT vs. LTZ: How One Trim Level Differs From The Others?

LS, LT, and LTZ stand for different trim levels on Chevy cars/trucks. A trim level will determine what options and packages are available for purchase. The higher you go on the trim levels, the more luxurious everything gets.

LS: “Luxury Sport”

LT: “Luxury Touring”

LTZ: “Luxury Touring Z”

This article will reveal the differences between the three trim levels.

Let’s go!!

What Does LS Mean On A Chevy Car?

The LS stands for “Luxury Sport” and is in the names of many Chevy models.
Credit: commons.wikimedia.org

The LS stands for “Luxury Sport” and is in the names of many Chevy models. The label means more than just an extra set or two. These cars are high quality with options that make them stand out among competitors’ vehicles alike.

You’ll find LS on certain trims from this automaker like:

  • Chevy Malibu
  • Chevy Trailblazer
  • Chevy Equinox
  • Chevy Trax
  • Chevy Traverse
  • Chevy Suburban
  • Chevy Tahoe
  • Chevy Camaro
  • Chevy Spark

What Does LT Stand For On A Chevy?

The LT stands for “Luxury Touring” and signifies models that have been enhanced to provide the utmost comfort while on your next adventure outdoors!
Credit: wikimedia.org

The LT stands for “Luxury Touring” and signifies models that have been enhanced to provide the utmost comfort while on your next adventure outdoors! Chevy’s Luxury Touring trims are a step up from their base-level configuration.

Chevy offers many options when it comes down to choosing what type of vehicle you want – whether it’s something sporty like a Corvette Stingray or family-friendly, durable yet fuel-efficient sedans such as Malibu.

Some popular Chevy vehicles with LT tag include: 

  • Chevy Equinox
  • Chevy Trailblazer
  • Chevy Tahoe
  • Chevy Trax
  • Chevy Suburban
  • Chevy Blazer
  • Chevy Silverado
  • Chevy Traverse
  • Chevy Bolt EV & EUV
  • Chevy Colorado
  • Chevy Malibu
  • Chevy Corvette Stingray
  • Chevy Spark
  • Chevy Camaro

Read more: 2009-2022 Chevy Traverse Oil Capacity & Oil Type: Free Lookup

What Does LTZ Stand For On A Chevy?

The LTZ in a Chevy stands for “Luxury Touring Z,” with the Z connoting the highest trim level.
Credit: wikimedia.org

The LTZ in a Chevy stands for “Luxury Touring Z,” with the Z connoting the highest trim level. This model offers users a unique look and sophisticated specs that remain true to its nomenclature, just like regular editions of lower levels. 

LTZ is the most expensive version which has been given this name because it’s designed especially for people who love driving around town or taking long trips on vacation rather than doing sports games at high speeds.

You will find LTZ available in almost all Chevy models, such as:

  • Chevy Equinox
  • Chevy Trailblazer
  • Chevy Tahoe
  • Chevy Trax
  • Chevy Suburban
  • Chevy Blazer
  • Chevy Silverado
  • Chevy Traverse
  • Chevy Colorado
  • Chevy Malibu
  • Chevy Spark
  • Chevy Camaro
The LS is for those who want extra amenities such as more excellent interiors or exterior upgrades and premium technology. The LT offers even better features at slightly higher prices than its predecessor. An LTZ includes everything from the remote start (and sunroof) right down to leather seats, which can be heated or cooled according to your preference – not just set temperature settings like in some vehicles! 

LS vs. LT

Chevy models come in various trims, and the L is for Chevrolet’s least expensive one. The base L model of the Chevy lineup is where you’ll find an affordable price with only standard features. 

When you get to the higher trim levels, you will find LS and LT. The LS is for those who want extra amenities such as more excellent interiors or exterior upgrades and premium technology. The LT offers even better features at slightly higher prices than its predecessor. 

While these vary from model to model, there is a sense that they’ve been designed with increased luxury in mind overall. 

A video about LT vs LS comparison.

LT vs. LTZ

The difference between an LT and an LTZ is simply the standard options that come included on your Chevy truck. The non-gathered (cloth) seat model will usually have cheaper trim pieces such as door handles or center consoles, whereas leather seats are always found in higher-end trucks.

The LTZ is loaded with all sorts of features, but what is the most significant difference between it and its less expensive sibling? You don’t have to pay for them. 

An LTZ Chevy car includes everything from the remote start (and sunroof) right down to leather seats, which can be heated or cooled according to your preference – not just set temperature settings like in some vehicles! 

And if you need more room on your trailering route, they’ve got an electric/power seat package perfect for when things get really heavy.

The engine of the LTZ model is the 6.2L EcoTec3 V8, whereas the 5.3L EcoTec and 3.0L Duramax turbo-diesel are the most powerful options for the LT model.

A video about LT vs LTS comparison.

LT Z71 vs. LTZ Z71

The Z71 offroad package was created to provide buyers with more options when it comes time to purchase their new car. Whether you want an off-road capable vehicle or just some added performance, this option has what most people need!

This package includes:

  • Upgraded shocks, 
  • All-terrain tires, 
  • Bigger wheels, 
  • And other features for offroad fans.

The Z71 is available, and the same for both the LT and LTZ trims, giving you more options to choose from.

Conclusion

LTZ represents the highest level, with features that include a leather interior and other exterior enhancements such as chrome wheels or cold air intakes, among others.

The cheaper trims like LS or LT don’t come with leather seats as an option, but they can be ordered through an upgrade or added onto another model if you want them!

Read more: TH350 vs. TH400 vs. 4L60E vs. 700R4

Author

  • Randy Worner

    My name is Randy Worner and I am the founder of chevygeek.com. I have been working on cars and trucks for almost 45 years. For the last 36 years I have taught Automotive / Diesel Technology classes for UTI, Snap On Tools, Chrysler, Pepboys, Lone Star College, NAPA and TBC Corporation. I also own a technical writing company known as Supreme Technical Services. It is ASE Gold Seal certified and Blue Seal Certified Author of auto/truck repair information.

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