SBC BBC V6 Chevy Engines Specs and Sizes [With Chart]

The classic car community, particularly hot rods, gets it going in small-block versus big-block V8 and V6 Chevy engines.

Every driver has their opinion on which is better, so if you’ve been wondering about their differences, this SBC BBC engine specs and sizes post is for you. 

Chevy’s groundbreaking V-8 engine arrived in 1955 with a fantastic 265c.i. displacement.

It was a compact powerhouse and was known as the small-block engine. But this was only the beginning because three years later, the big block debuted featuring 348c.i. displacement.

GM was not stopping with the big block as it introduced the more compact yet powerful 90° V6 engine in 1978 featuring 200 cu.in displacement. 

The 265, 200, and 348 Chevys would only give way to even more powerful and remarkable motors.

To this end, I’ve compiled a list of SBC, 90° V6, and BBC engines with their specs and sizes for easy comprehension.

Read on. 

chevy engine specs

Small Block Chevy Engines Specs and Sizes

The small-block Chevy changed the direction of the automotive industry. Before it debuted, the hot rod community did not give much thought to Chevy’s Stovebolt Six Engines.

But upon its arrival in 1955, the small-block Chevy was breathtaking, and it would lead to future technology and innovation advances in other V-8 designs. 

The small-block Chevy changed the direction of the automotive industry. Credit: commons.wikimedia.org

Let’s look at each of the small-block Chevy engines families.

SBC
Engine Code
YearsDisplacement
c.i.(cc)
Bore x Stroke
in mm
Power HP(kW)TorqueCompression RatioBlock and heads
(Iron or Alumium)
2651955-19574,342 cc95.25 mm x 76.20 mm180 hp (134 kW)
210 hp (157 kW)
225 hp (168 kW)
240 hp (179 kW)
257lb.-ft
270lb.-ft
8.00:1
9.25:1
10.3:1
Iron
2831957-19674,637 cc98.45 mm x 76.2 mm188 hp (140 kW)
283 hp (211 kW)
290 lb.ft8.5:1
9.5:1
10.5:1
Iron
3071968-19735,030 cc98.5 mm x 82.8 mm200 hp (149 kW)
130 hp (97 kW)
115 hp (86 kW)
300 lb.-ft
230 lb.-ft
205 lb.-ft
9.1:1Aluminum
3021967 - 19694,948 cc101.6 mm x 76.2 mm290 hp (216 kW)290 lb.ft11.0:1Iron
3271962 - 19695,363 cc102 mm x 82.55 mm225 - 383 (168 - 286 kW)352 lb.-ft
344 lb.-ft
11.0:1Iron
3501967 - 20055,735 cc101.6 mm x 88.4 mm145 hp - 350 hp255 lb. -ft -
380 lb.-ft
8.2:1 -
11.0:1
Iron
- 350 L461967 - 19805,735 cc101.6 mm x 88.4 mm350 hp (261 kW)380 lb.-ft11.0:1Iron
- 350 L651970 - 19765,733 cc101.6 mm × 88.4 mm145 hp (108 kW)255 lb. -ft9.1:1Iron
- 350 LM11977 - 19885,733 cc101.6 mm × 88.4 mm155 - 175 hp (116 - 130 kW)270 lb.-ft
280 lb.-ft
8.5:1
8.2:1
Iron
- 350 ZQ31969 - 19745,733 cc101.6 mm × 88.4 mm190 - 300 hp (142 - 224 kW)270 lb.-ft10.25:1
8.5:1
Iron
- 350 LT11970 - 19725,733 cc101.6 mm x 88.4 mm250 hp - 370 hp (186 - 276 kW)270 - 300 lb.-ft9.1:1Iron
- 350 L821973 - 19805,733 cc101.6 mm x 88.4 mm205 hp - 250 hp (153 - 186 kW)255 -285 lb.-ft9.1:1Iron
- 350 L8119815,733 cc101.6 mm x 88.4 mm190 hp (142 kW)350 lb.-ft8.2:1Iron
- 350 LS91969 - 19865,733 cc101.6 mm x 88.4 mm165 hp (123 kW)275 lb.-ft8.2:1Iron
- 350 LT91981 - 19865,733 cc101.6 mm x 88.4 mm160 hp (119 kW)250 lb.-ft8.3:1Iron
- 350 L831982, 19845,733 cc101.6 mm x 88.4 mm200 - 205 hp (149 -153 kW)350 lb.-ft9.0:1Iron
- 350 L981985 - 19925,733 cc101.6 mm x 88.4 mm225 - 250 hp (168 - 186 kW)330–345 lb⋅ft9.5 - 10:1Iron/Aluminum
- 350 L051987 - 19965,733 cc101.6 mm x 88.4 mm195 hp - 210 hp310 lb.-ft9.1:1Iron
- 350 L311987 - 20055,733 cc101.6 mm x 88.4 mm255 hp - 350 hp (190 - 261 kW)350 lb.-ft9.4:1Iron
4001970 -19806,554 cc104.8 mm x 92.25 mm245 hp - 265 hp (183 - 198 kW)Up to 400 lb.-ft10.5:1Iron
2621975 - 19764,301 cc93.2 mm × 78.7 mm110 hp (82 kW)195 lb.-ft9.1:1Iron
3051976-20035,001 cc94.9 mm × 88.4 mm120 hp - 230 hp214 lb.-ft -
285 lb.-ft
8.3:1 - 9.5:1Iron block, aluminum heads
- 305 LG31976 - 19805,001 cc94.9 mm × 88.4 mm130 hp (97 kW)250 lb.-ft8.5:1Iron block, aluminum heads
- 305 LG41980 - 19875,001 cc94.9 mm × 88.4 mm150 - 170 hp (112 - 127 kW)240 - 250 lb.-ft8.4:1 to 8.6:1Iron block, aluminum heads
- 305 LU51982 - 19845,001 cc94.9 mm × 88.4 mm165 hp - 175 hp (123 kW - 130 kW)240 - 250 lb.-ft9.5:1Iron block, aluminum heads
- 305 L691983 - 19865,001 cc94.9 mm × 88.4 mm180 - 190 hp (134 - 142 kW240 lb.-ft9.5:1Iron block, aluminum heads
- 305 LE91981 -19865,001 cc94.9 mm × 88.4 mm165 hp (123 kW)240 lb.-ft9.5:1Iron block, aluminum heads
- 305 LB91985 - 19925,001 cc94.9 mm × 88.4 mm190–230 hp (142–172 kW)275 - 300 lb.-ft9.5:1Iron block, aluminum heads
- 305 L031987 - 19955,001 cc94.9 mm × 88.4 mm170 hp (127 kW)275 lb. -ft9.5:1Iron block, aluminum heads
- 305 L301996 - 20035,020 cc95 mm × 88.4 mm230 hp (172 kW)285 lb.-ft9.1:1Iron block, aluminum heads
2671979 - 19824,389 cc88.4 mm x 88.9 mm120 hp (89 kW)215 lb.-ft8.3:1Iron

Download the full comparison chart here

265 Turbo Fire V8 (4.3L,  3.75 In × 3.00 In) 

263 Turbo Fire V8 started the small-block revolution. It was made in 1955 for over 50% of all Chevys sold. The 265 Turbo Fire features the same 4.4-inch bore spacing and 90-degree design as the original 265 of 1917, and GM used its early model manual transmission/two-barrel orders. 

Since the 265 was a pushrod engine featuring hydraulic lifters, it was available with a four-barrel Rochester carburetor (optional) to increase horsepower to 180 HP (134kW) or 195 HP (145kW) in the Corvette. Trucks using this engine would have iron blocks with thicker cylinder walls, allowing for 1.125-inch (1/8-inch) boring for 283-CID.

In 1956, you could get the engine in three versions: single, four-barrel carburetor 210 HP, twin, four-barrels, 225 HP, and two four-barrel carburetors and high-lift camshaft, 240 HP. The 265’s production ended in 1956, paving the way for the 283. 

A video about 265 – The original small block Chevy.

283c.i. (4.6L, 3.876 In x 3.00 In)

283 small-block Chevy engines could make 1 HP per cubic inch in ’57 owing to Rochester fuel injection and a “Duntov” camshaft. 
Credit: commons.wikimedia.org

The first 283 small-block Chevy engines used 265 blocks, but future ones have 3.876 bores. This engine has five different versions, produced between 1957 and 1967. The 283 V-8 was a passenger car option, and it could make 1 HP per cubic inch in ’57 owing to Rochester fuel injection and a “Duntov” camshaft. 

All 283 versions had horsepower between 188 HP and 283 HP. The horsepower went up a bit every year, allowing the engine to be available for Corvette and Checker Taxis. 

307c.i. (5.0L, 3.876 In × 3.26 In)

The 307c.i. engine started production in 1968 to replace the 283. However, it was still essentially a 283 but with rods and crankshaft from a 327. It was the smallest small-block Chevy until the 305 replaced it in 1973. 

Upon its introduction, the 307 featured 200 HP at 4600 RPM and 300 lb.-ft of torque. However, due to the emission regulations of 1972, it de-rated to 115 HP. The 307 used 3.875-inch cylinder bores, a 327 crankshaft with 3.25-inch arms, and 5.7-inch rods.

The 307 SBC high compression summit.

Read more: SBC Head Casting Numbers: Full List & Lookup

302c.i. (5.7L, 4.00 In x 3.00 In)

This particular engine was designed for Z/28 Camaro to comply with the Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) Trans-Am Series regulations. The engine displacement was limited to 305c.i. from 1967 to 1969. Hence, the 283 3-inch stroke crankshaft was placed into a 4-inch bore block. Its horsepower rating is 290 hp (216 kW), and it has 290 lb.-ft torque. 

327c.i. (5.4L, 4.00 In x 3.25 In)

The 327c.i.5.4L small-block Chevy had a bore and stroke of 4-inch (102 mm) x 3.25-inch (82.55).
Credit: commons.wikimedia.org

The 327c.i.5.4L small-block Chevy had a bore and stroke of 4-inch (102 mm) x 3.25-inch (82.55). GM produced this engine from 1962 through 1969. Its power ranged from 250 hp to 375 hp depending on the fuel injection or choice of the carburetor, cylinder heads, pistons, camshaft, and intake manifold

If you had a Duntov solid lifter cam version, it produced 360 hp and 352 lb.-ft with the Rochester mechanical fuel injection or 340 hp and 344 lb.-ft torque with a single Carter four-barrel. The peak horsepower rating for the 327 was 375 hp with Rochester Ram-Jet fuel injection system now named L84 or 365 hp with four-barrel Holley carburetor also known as L76. 

The Dyno test of 327 SBC engine.

350c.i. (5.7L, 4.00 In x 3.48 In)

With a 3.48 mm stroke, the 350c.i. engine was the first high-performance small-block L-48 for the 1967 Camaro.
Credit: commons.wikimedia.org

With a 3.48 mm stroke, the 350c.i. engine was the first high-performance small-block L-48 for the 1967 Camaro. This engine was made available for passenger cars and trucks, and it was easy to tune to great numbers. While it was still based on the 327, the 350 had an all-new crankshaft. 

The L-48 was its first version with a horsepower of 295 and 380 lb.-ft of torque. It used a hydraulic cam, cast pistons, and 4bbl Quadrajet carburetor. 

The thumpr cam of SBC 350.

Read more: Chevy 350: What Year Is The Best Chevy 350 Engine?

Other versions of the 350 include:

350
Engine Code
YearsDisplacement
c.i.(cc)
Bore x Stroke
in mm
Power HP(kW)TorqueCompression RatioBlock and heads
(Iron or Alumium)
350 L461967 - 19805,735 cc101.6 mm x 88.4 mm350 hp (261 kW)380 lb.-ft11.0:1Iron
350 L651970 - 19765,733 cc101.6 mm × 88.4 mm145 hp (108 kW)255 lb. -ft9.1:1Iron
350 LM11977 - 19885,733 cc101.6 mm × 88.4 mm155 - 175 hp (116 - 130 kW)270 lb.-ft
280 lb.-ft
8.5:1
8.2:1
Iron
350 ZQ31969 - 19745,733 cc101.6 mm × 88.4 mm190 - 300 hp (142 - 224 kW)270 lb.-ft10.25:1
8.5:1
Iron
350 LT11970 - 19725,733 cc101.6 mm x 88.4 mm250 hp - 370 hp (186 - 276 kW)270 - 300 lb.-ft9.1:1Iron
350 L821973 - 19805,733 cc101.6 mm x 88.4 mm205 hp - 250 hp (153 - 186 kW)255 -285 lb.-ft9.1:1Iron
350 L8119815,733 cc101.6 mm x 88.4 mm190 hp (142 kW)350 lb.-ft8.2:1Iron
350 LS91969 - 19865,733 cc101.6 mm x 88.4 mm165 hp (123 kW)275 lb.-ft8.2:1Iron
350 LT91981 - 19865,733 cc101.6 mm x 88.4 mm160 hp (119 kW)250 lb.-ft8.3:1Iron
350 L831982, 19845,733 cc101.6 mm x 88.4 mm200 - 205 hp (149 -153 kW)350 lb.-ft9.0:1Iron
350 L981985 - 19925,733 cc101.6 mm x 88.4 mm225 - 250 hp (168 - 186 kW)330–345 lb⋅ft9.5 - 10:1Iron/Aluminum
350 L051987 - 19965,733 cc101.6 mm x 88.4 mm195 hp - 210 hp310 lb.-ft9.1:1Iron
350 L311987 - 20055,733 cc101.6 mm x 88.4 mm255 hp - 350 hp (190 - 261 kW)350 lb.-ft9.4:1Iron

350 L46 (1967 – 1980)

This was an optional engine for the 1969 Corvette. It was larger than the original 350 with an extra 13 cubic inches. It has a revised cam timing and a completely different induction system. In addition, the L46 has a Rochester Q-jet carburetor and low-rise intake made of cast iron. 

The driving test of L46.

350 L65 (1970 – 1976)

L65 engine is used in the 1970 Camaro with 250 hp and 2bbl Rochester carburetor. The horsepower dropped to 245 hp in 1971 and later to 145 net hp in 1972 and 145 net hp between 1973 – 1975. Overall, it had 255 lb.-ft of torque. 

350 LM1 (1977 – 1988)

This motor also used the 350 as the base engine but with various variations over the years. In 1977, it had a rated horsepower of 170 @ 3800 RPM with a compression ratio of 8.5:1 and 270 lb.-ft of torque @2400 RPM. The compression ratio lowered to 8.2:1 owing to a less-restrictive cool air duction system designed for this engine in 1978. The power was at 185 hp @ 4000 RPM and 280 lb.-ft @ 2400 RPM.

350 ZQ3 (1969 – 1974)

This is the standard engine in the 1969 – 1974 Chevrolet Corvette. From 1969 to 1970, its power was 300 hp with a 10.25:1 compression ratio. The engine has hydraulic lifters and uses an L48 camshaft and a Rochester “4MV” Quadra-Jet 4-barrel carburetor. 

ZQ3’s power was reduced to 270 hp in 1971 and 300 lb.-ft of torque with an 8.5:1 compression ratio. In 1972, the power decreased further to 200 hp and 270 lb.-ft torque, and by 1973 it was down to 190 hp. Nonetheless, power increased in the 1974 version to 195 hp. 

To this end, Chevy engines made after 1971 had a thicker cylinder neck but lower nickel content. Combined with the less iron used in post-1974 engines and lower compression ratio, it’s no wonder these engines were less powerful than the previous 350 versions. 

350 LT1 (1970 – 1972)

LT1 engine was available for the Chevrolet Corvette ZR-1 and Camaro Z28.

LT1 was the most popular 350ci. V8. It features solid lifters, an 11:1 compression ratio, a 780 CFM Holley 4-barrel carburetor, a ‘178’ high-performance camshaft, and a unique aluminum intake. Further, the LT1 engine produced a factory rating of 370 hp @ 6000 RPM and 380 lb.-ft of torque @ 4000 RPM. 

The engine was available for the Chevrolet Corvette ZR-1 and Camaro Z28. Again, the power went down in 1971 to 330 hp and 360 lb.-ft of torque and a 9:1 compression ratio. In 1972, the horsepower measurements were net at 255 hp and 280 lb.-ft. 

The information video about SBC LT1.

Read more: LBZ Vs. LMM Vs. LML Vs. L5P (with Comparison Chart)

 350 L82 (1973 – 1980, 4.00 In x 3.48 In)

This was a performance version of the 350c.i. engine, and it used a Rochester Quadra-Jet 4-barrel carburetor on LT1 “2.02” heads. The four-bolt main configuration housed a forged steel camshaft. In addition, L82 has 5.700-inch forged rods, also known as GM’s pink rods. 

The L82 featured forged aluminum pistons reciprocated inside 4.00-inch cylinders with a 3.48-inch stroke. This engine produced 210 hp at 5,500 RPM, significantly smaller than other 350c.i.engines.

A video about L82 SBC.

350 L81 (1981)

This was the only 350c.i.(5.7L) engine for Corvette in 1981. Its horsepower was 190 hp, and torque was at 280 lb.-ft with an 8:2.1 compression ratio. It was similar to the 1980 L48, except it had a computer control spark advance which replaced the vacuum advance. 

350 LS9 (1969 – 1986) 

With 165 hp, the LS9 was used in C/K/G 10/20 trucks weighing less than 8,500 pounds. This motor had a Rochester 4-bbl carburetor and could reach 275 lb.-ft  torque @ 1600 RPM. 

350 LT9 (1981 – 1986)

The LT-9 had a 160 hp @ 3800 RPM specification and was GM’s 350c.i.(5.7L) variant for truck-based heavy emissions for G model passenger and cargo vans and K20/K30 pickups. This engine was capable of 250 lb.-ft of torque with an 8.3:1 compression ratio. 

350 L83 (1982, 1984)

The L83 was another 5.7L 350 cu engine, but it had an automatic transmission, unlike other 350 small-block engines. The engine could produce 200 hp and 285 lb.-ft torque with a 9:1 compression ratio. Furthermore, it was used on the new 1984 Vette with 205 hp and 290 lb.-ft torque. 

350 L98 (1985 – 1992)

The L98 was standard in 1985 – 1991 Corvette, rated at 230 hp to 250 hp and 330 to 350 lb.-ft torque.
Credit: commons.wikimedia.org

GM added tune-port fuel injection in L98, producing 230 hp and 330 lb.-ft torque. The L98 was standard in 1985 – 1991 Corvette, rated at 230 hp to 250 hp and 330 to 350 lb.-ft torque. Nevertheless, L98 was optional on 1987 – 1992 Pontiac Camaro and Chevrolet Camaro, rated at 225 – 245 hp and 330 lb.-ft torque. Anyway, all 1987 L98 versions had ten hp more owing to a 9:5.1 compression ratio. 

The tips and tricks to working on the Corvette L98.

350 L05 (1987 – 1996)

The L05 engine was introduced in 1987 and 1988 models as it was used in GMT400 and R/V series. L05s had 64cc combustion chambers with casting number 14102193 cylinder heads featuring swirled intake ports. Several vehicles use this engine, including 1992/1993 Buick Roadmaster, 1990 – 1992 Cadillac Brougham, and 1993 Cadillac Fleetwood. GM later replaced it with the LT1 after 1993, and its production stopped in 1996. 

350 L31 (1987 – 2005)

Known as the Vortec 5700, the L31 is a 5.7L V8 engine that replaced the L05. This engine can produce 255 hp to 350 hp at 4600 RPM and 330 to 350 lb.-ft torque @ 2800 RPM. GM also calls it G1+ since it was the final expression of the 1955-vintage small block Chevy, which ended production in 2005. 

400c.i. (6.6L, 4.125 In x 3.750 In)

400c.i. engine came with a 4-inch (104.8 mm) bore and a 3.75-inch (95.3 mm) stroke. Credit: commons.wikimedia.org

400c.i. engine launched in 1970 and remained in production until 1980. It came with a 4-inch (104.8 mm) bore and a 3.75-inch (95.3 mm) stroke. The 400 differs from other small-block Chevy engines since it has siamesed cylinders requiring the block to have steam holes, head gaskets, and heads that help with hot spots alleviation. 

The 400 is the only engine that uses a 2.1-inch rod bearing journal and a 2.65-inch main bearing journal. Unlike other small blocks that use a 5.7-inch connecting rod, the 400 small-block Chevy uses a 5.565-inch rod.

Early models of the 400 could achieve 265 hp with a two-barrel carburetor. The four-barrel carburetor was available in 1974, and 1976 was the last year where GM used it in passenger cars.

The difference of SBC 400.

262c.i. (4.3L, 3.671 In x 3.10 In) 

262c.i. engine was produced between 1975 and 1976. It featured a 90-degree pushrod with an iron block and heads. 262c.i.has 3.61 x 3.1 bore and stroke. Besides, it was Chevrolet’s second 4.3L power plant with 110 hp in 1975 @ 3600 RPM and 195 lb.-ft torque @ 2000 RPM

305c.i. (5.0L, 3.750 In × 3.48 In)

305c.i. engine replaced the 262c.i.It was still a 262, but it was bored out and stroked using the 350c.i. This motor was an economic engine as it was fuel-efficient and fairly reliable. Nonetheless, it had a 305c.i.displacement with a 3.7350-inch bore and a 3.48-inch stroke. 

While the 305 is a powerful engine, most enthusiasts prefer the 350 since the latter is available in many versions. Moreover, the same parts usually produce more power in a 350c.i.package. Hence, rebuild kits for 305 are more expensive than 350 kits. Still, the 305 has enormous power potential thanks to the availability of readily interchangeable aftermarket parts. 

Note that you can’t adopt all types of cylinder heads to this engine, but many L03 setups can produce more than 300 hp with the proper setup. The 305 was used in many vehicles between 1976 and 1987, but after 1996, its usage was only on light trucks and SUVs until 2000. This engine is still in production for Mercury Marine as a marine power plant. 

305
Engine Code
YearsDisplacement
c.i.(cc)
Bore x Stroke
in mm
Power HP(kW)TorqueCompression RatioBlock and heads
(Iron or Alumium)
 
305 LG31976 - 19805,001 cc94.9 mm × 88.4 mm130 hp (97 kW)250 lb.-ft8.5:1Iron block, aluminum heads
305 LG41980 - 19875,001 cc94.9 mm × 88.4 mm150 - 170 hp (112 - 127 kW)240 - 250 lb.-ft8.4:1 to 8.6:1Iron block, aluminum heads
305 LU51982 - 19845,001 cc94.9 mm × 88.4 mm165 hp - 175 hp (123 kW - 130 kW)240 - 250 lb.-ft9.5:1Iron block, aluminum heads
305 L691983 - 19865,001 cc94.9 mm × 88.4 mm180 - 190 hp (134 - 142 kW240 lb.-ft9.5:1Iron block, aluminum heads
305 LE91981 -19865,001 cc94.9 mm × 88.4 mm165 hp (123 kW)240 lb.-ft9.5:1Iron block, aluminum heads
305 LB91985 - 19925,001 cc94.9 mm × 88.4 mm190–230 hp (142–172 kW)275 - 300 lb.-ft9.5:1Iron block, aluminum heads
305 L031987 - 19955,001 cc94.9 mm × 88.4 mm170 hp (127 kW)275 lb. -ft9.5:1Iron block, aluminum heads
305 L301996 - 20035,020 cc95 mm × 88.4 mm230 hp (172 kW)285 lb.-ft9.1:1Iron block, aluminum heads

305c.i.Iterations:

305 LG3 (1976 – 1980)

Produced in 1976, the LG3 was the first variant of the 305. From 1976 through 1978, it used a Rochester 2GC carburetor. In 1979, it used the Dualjet 2-bbl carburetor, which was more fuel-efficient. However, its horsepower dropped to 130 hp and 125 hp for California emission cars. Nonetheless, all years used a compression ratio of 8.5:1. 

305 LG4 (1980 – 1987)

LG4 engine produced 150 hp – 170 hp and 240 – 250 lb.-ft torque, and it had a knock sensor to manage the engine displacement system. In 1995, a more aggressive spark timing map and a higher compression increased the hp to 165 hp. 

305 LU5 (1982 – 1984)

Named the Crossfire EFI 5.0L, the LU5 was initially designed for the 1982 Camaro but was made available for the ‘82 Trans Am. It had a dual-throttle body injection configuration based on the original “Cross-ram Intake” on the 1969 Camaro Z28. 

The LU5 was rated at 165 hp and was available as an automatic transmission on the 1982 Camaro. In 1983, it was rated at 175 hp. 

305 L69 (1983 – 1986) 

The L69 engine features an L83 camshaft and LU5 heads, and it has a 9.5:1 compression ratio. Besides, it comes with a dual-snorkel air cleaner assembly, a knock sensor, an aluminum intake manifold, and an aluminum flywheel. This engine can produce 190 hp @ 4800 RPM and 240 lb.-ft    torque.

305 LE9 (1981 – 1986)

This was a truck/car/van version of the 305c.i.engine. It had a 4BBL 650CFM with a 9.5:1 compression ratio. The LE9 had flattop pistons, the “929” truck 350 camshaft to produce more torque, and 58 cc chambers. Not to mention 14022601 casting heads. The engine produced 210 hp @ 4600 RPM and 250 lb.-ft @ 2000 RPM.

305 LB9 (1985 – 1992)

This was the first small-block Chevy to have tuned-port fuel injection. Introduced in 1985, it had 215 hp and 275 lb.-ft torque. Besides, its horsepower varied between 190 hp and 230 hp, and torque varied between 275 lb.-ft to 300 lb.-ft. This engine was optional in 1985 – 1992 Chevrolet Camaro and Firebird Pontiac vehicles. 

305 L03 (1987 – 1995)

The L03 engine featured 170 hp @ 4400 RPM and 275 lb.-ft  torque @ 2400 RPM. It was a low output 305c.i.engine used in 1993 – 1995 GM trucks. Still, it used throttle-body fuel injection. 

305 L30 (1996 – 2003)

The L30 is also the Vortec 5000 V8 truck engine with a 5,020-cc displacement (305.4c.i.). A bore and stroke of 95 mm x 88.4 mm and 9.1:1 compression ratio is based on the Gen I small-block Chevy. The 4.8L Vortec 4800 LR4 replaced the L30 in 2003 full-size vans. 

The van configuration produces 220 hp net flywheel @ 4600 RPM and 290 lb.-ft net flywheel torque. In the C/K configuration, the 4.8L Vortec 4800 produces 230 hp net flywheel @ 4600 RPM and 290 lb.-ft flywheel torque.

This motor uses high-flowing, fast, burn-style Vortec heads, and a hydraulic roller cam. Some of its applications are in Chevrolet Express/GMC Savana and General Motors C/K full-size trucks. 

The difference between 350 and 305.

267c.i. (4.4L, 3.48 In x 3.50 In)

The Chevy 267 engine is in the 3.50-inch bore family produced between 1979 and 1982. This motor was used in GM F-Body Camaro, G-bodies El Camino, Chevrolet Monte, and Malibu Classic), and GM B-bodies. It had a displacement of 4,390-cc with the smallest small-block bore of 3.5 inches and a 3.48-inch stroke. 

At first, the 267c.i. engine had Rochester Dualjet 210 with no rear barrels. Later in 1980, it used an electronic feedback carburetor. It’s important to note that even though 267c.i. has a displacement similar to other 4.3L – 4.4L V8 engines by GM, it does not share parts with other engines. Moreover, the engine was phased out in 1982 as it did not meet emission standards.

The explained video about GM Small Block.

Read mode: GM/Chevy Engine Serial Number Lookup

Big Block Chevy Engines Specs and Sizes

The big-block Chevy started as a significant upgrade from the 348/409 W motor. It is a 90-degree, naturally-aspirated overhead valve engine for gasoline-powered V8 engines. This engine started production in 1958 and remains in production to date. 

If you’re a car enthusiast, rebuilding a big block is considered smart because it is easy to maintain. Also a BBC engine sits lower in the car for better weight distribution and gives you an easy time getting low-end torque. 

Let’s look at big-block Chevy engines by generation. 

BBC
Engine Code
YearsDisplacement
c.i.(cc)
Bore x Stroke
in mm
Power
HP (kW)
TorqueCompression RatioBlock and heads
(Iron or Alumium)
3481958 - 1961348 c.i.104.8 mm × 82.6 mm250 hp - 350 hp (186 kW - 261 kW)355 lb.-ft9.5:1Iron block
Iron or aluminum heads
4091961 - 1965409 c.i.109.5 mm × 88.9 mm360 hp - 425 hp (268 kW - 317 kW)Up to 425 lb.-ft11.0:1Iron
4271963427 c.i.109.5 mm x 92.71430 hp (321 kW)575 lb.-ft13.5:1Aluminum
3661960s - 2004366 c.i.99.9 mm × 95.5 mm300 hp360 lb.-ft9.4:1Iron block
Aluminum heads
3961965 - 1972396 c.i.104 mm × 95.5 mm375 hp (280 kW)415 lb.-ft10.25:1Iron
4021970 - 1972396 c.i.104.8 mm x 95.5 mm375 hp (280 kW)415 lb.-ft10.25:1Aluminum
4271966 - 1969427 c.i.108 mm x 95.5 mm390 hp - 430 hp (291 kW - 321 kW)460 lb.-ft10.25:1 to 12.00:1Iron/aluminum block
Iron/aluminum heads
ZL11969427 c.i.108 mm x 95.5 mm430 hp (321 kW)12.0:1Aluminum
4541970 - 1974454 c.i.108 mm × 101.6 mm390 hp (291 kW)500 lb.-ft10.0:1Iron block
Aluminum heads
L191987 - 1990454 c.i.108 mm × 101.6 mm230 hp - 255 hp (172 kW - 190 kW)385 lb.-ft - 405 lb.-ft7.9:1Iron block
Aluminum heads
6.0 (l50)1991366 c.i.101.6 mm x 91.94 mm300 hp360 lb.-ft9.4:1Iron block
Aluminum heads
L19 Gen V1991 - 1995454 c.i.108 mm × 101.6 mm230 hp380 lb.-ft7.9:1Iron block
Aluminum heads
5021965 - 2005502 c.i.113.4 mm × 101.6 mm338 - 600 hp (252 - 447 kW)470 to 567 lb.-ft 9.6:1Iron
ZZ5721998 - present454 c.i.115.8 mm × 111.1 mm620 hp (462 kW) 650 lb.-ft12.0:1iron block Aluminum heads
ZZ6322021 - present632 c.i.116.84 mm x 120.65 mm1,004 hp876 lb.-ft12.0:1iron block Aluminum heads
Vortec 7400 (L29)1996 - 2000454 c.i.108. mm × 101.6 mm290 hp410 lb.-ft9.4:1iron block Aluminum heads
Vortec 7400 (L21)1998 - 2001454 c.i.108. mm × 101.6 mm290 hp410 lb.-ft9.4:1iron block Aluminum heads
Vortec 8100 (L18)2001 - 2009496 c. i.107.95. mm × 111 mm330 hp (254 kW)455 lb.-ft9.1:1Iron

Download the full comparison chart here

W Series (Mark-I) 

The standard sizes for this engine are 348cu in, 409cu in, and 427c.i.These engines were manufactured from 1958 to 1965. The W series had W-shaped valve covers owing to the offset overhead-valve design. Additionally, all W Series engines have cast iron blocks and heads. They feature 4.84-inch bores and two-bolt main bearing caps.

In addition, W-Series motors had interchangeable cylinder heads and a side oiling lubrication system. 

348 (5.7L, 4.125 In x 3.25 In)

BBC 348 engine has a 4.125 x 3.25-inch bore and stroke and a 9.5:1 compression ratio. It can produce 250 hp on the four-barrel carburetor motor, 280 hp on the Super-Turbo Thrust (triple-two barrel) version, and 305 hp on the single, large four-barrel carburetor version (Special-Turbo Thrust). 

Mechanical lifters brought the Special Super Turbo-Thrust and a two-barrel carburetor enabling the 348c.i. to reach 315 hp. Furthermore, GM produced high-output versions of the 1958 and 1960 engines with 320 hp and 335 hp, respectively. The single, four-barrel engine and triple two barrels also had a high-output iteration with 340 hp and 350 hp, respectively. 

409 (6.7L, 4.31 In x 3.50 In)

BBC 409 engine started at 360 hp and was phased out upon reaching 425 hp.
Credit: pxhere.com

BBC 409 engine started at 360 hp and was phased out upon reaching 425 hp. The engine featured a 4.31 x 3.5 -inch bore and stroke with a choice of single or 2 x 4-barrel Rochester carburetors. The initial, single 4-barrel Carter AFB carburetor engine had 360 hp but increased to 380 hp in 1962. 

This engine also had a 409 hp version featuring a dual, four-barrel aluminum intake manifold, enabling it to develop one hp per cubic inch power. In addition, it had two Carter AFB carburetors and a forged-steel crankshaft. 

The 1963 model reached 425 hp @ 6000 RPM and 425 lb.-ft torque @ 4200 RPM. It had Rochester 2 x 4 – barrel carburetor with an 11:1 compression ratio and solid-lifter camshaft. 

A video about Chevy 409.

427 (Z11, 7.0L, 4.31 In x 3.65 In)

This rare version of the Z11 is a version of the 409. Its stroke was increased by 0.150 inches, and it also came with domed pistons and larger main bearings. Hence, it was more desirable to drag racers and NASCAR (the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing, LLC). 

The 427cu in. featured 7.0L displacement with a cowl-induction air system and aluminum body parts. 

Mark II 

Mark II began with 409c.i.(6/7) iteration but ended up as a 396c.i.(6.5) engine. Credit: commons.wikimedia.org

This was a race-only engine produced in 1963 only. Its development began with 409c.i.(6/7) iteration but ended up as a 396c.i.(6.5) engine. Nevertheless, only the 427c.i.(Mark IIS) (7.0L) ever raced. 

A car story and engine sound of 1956 Continental Mark II by Lou Costabile.

Mark III

Although its tooling and production rights were already being considered for purchase, Chevrolet never produced this engine. However, the project never started. 

A car story and engine sound of 1971 Lincoln Continental Mark III by Lou Costabile.

Mark IV 

Mark IV was known as the king of the crate engines since it featured an introductory 325 hp/ 410 lb.-ft torque.
Credit: commons.wikimedia.org

GM produced this engine from 1965 to 1974. It was known as the king of the crate engines since it featured an introductory 325 hp/ 410 lb.-ft torque. The Mark IV motor had an innovative valve layout where the heads allowed it to be highly favorable for revs despite being large. 

The cylinder block of Mark IV engines used 4.84-inch bores alongside a larger 2.75-inch main bearing. The engine also featured crowned pistons in conventional models and forged (impact-extruded) solid skirt types in high-performance models. 

366 (6.0L, 3.935 In x 3.76 In)

The 366 is a 3.935 In x 3.76-inch bore and stroke engine for Chevrolet medium-duty trucks, police sedans, and school buses. With a 9.4:1 compression ratio, the 366c.i. is not desirable by hot rods since it has a small-bore. 

GMC 366 big block engine.

396 (6.5L, 4.094 In × 3.76 In)

The 396 high-output version was used in the 1965 Corvette (known as L78) and in the Z16 Chevelle (as L37) with 375 horsepower rating.
Credit: commons.wikimedia.org

Known as L78 in the 1965 Corvette and L37 in the Z16 Chevelle, this high-output version was used in the 1965 Corvette (known as L78) and in the Z16 Chevelle (as L37) with 375 horsepower rating. The 396c.i.featured solid lifter cam and similar bore to the 366c.i.engine, but the stroke was longer at 3.76 inches. 

402 (6.6L, 4.126 In x 3.76 In)

This motor was introduced in 1970, featuring a 396c.i.block, which was bored out by 0.03 inches making it 4.126 inches. It was six cubic inches larger than the 396, but Chevrolet continued to market it as such. 

427 (7.0L, 4.25 In x 3.76 In)

The 427 engine comes with high-revving solid lifters in full-size Corvettes and Chevrolets.
Credit: commons.wikimedia.org

You can find the 427 engine for family cars with hydraulic flat-tappet lifters. Moreover, it comes with high-revving solid lifters in full-size Corvettes and Chevrolets. The 427 is a street version producing 435 hp @ 5800 RPM and 460 lb.-ft torque @ 4000 RPM. This engine features the big-bore block at 4.25 inches with a 3.76-inch stroke. 

The 427c.i. engine came in four main versions, including the Large 71, L72, L88, and ZL1. The L71 was available from 1967 to 1969 Corvettes, and it had 3 x 2- barrel Holley (Tri-Power) carburetors. The L72, on the other hand, was a single, 4-barrel carburetor engine. 

Both L71 and L72 engines could yield 0-60 mph in 5.6 seconds and reach a ¼ mile in 13.8 seconds at 104 mph. 

1969 Chevy 427 Dyno Test video.
ZL1

The ZL1 version of the 427c.i. engine was explicitly designed for Can-Am racing. This engine specs are nearly identical to the L88 in that it has an all-aluminum cylinder block and aluminum cylinder heads. 

The ZL1 was a legend of its time; that’s why it managed to find its way in the 21st century, as its original tooling was discovered a couple of years ago. Initial dyno tests of the engine produced 376 hp SAE net. Still, it could reach an outstanding 524 hp SAE gross with optimal carb and ignition tuning alongside open, long-tube racing headers and no air cleaner or power-sapping engine accessories. 

All 427 engines except the ZL1 had a torque rating of 460 lb.-ft. 

The Dyno test of Chevy 427 ZL1 engine.

454 (7.4L, 4.25 In x 4.00 In)

454 big block had the same bore as the 427c.i. (4.25 inches) but with slightly more stroke than the 427c.i.at 4 inches.
Credit: commons.wikimedia.org

GM added the 454 big-block Chevy in 1970 (known as LS5 and LS6 in 1970 Chevrolet Corvette). It had the same bore as the 427c.i. (4.25 inches) but with slightly more stroke than the 427c.i.at 4 inches. Like its other counterparts, this engine had various versions. The first is the LS5, with a factory horsepower rating of 390 hp and 500 lb.-ft of torque. 

The LS engine had a single 4-barrel Holley carburetor upgraded to 450hp @ 5600 RPM and 500 lb.-ft torque @ 3600 RPM. It was thought that the LS-6 was underrated and produced 500 hp from the factory. 

Meanwhile, the LS6 was not the most powerful version of the 454c.i.since the LS-7 was its other option producing 465 horsepower, and 610 lb.-ft of torque was available. The good thing with the LS-7 is that you can find several of its intake manifolds since Chevrolet manufactured several of them individually and made them available to the public. Later, the LS-7 was made available as a crate engine with a rated power of 500 hp gross. 

Unfortunately, the LS-6 was discontinued in 1970, and the LS-5’s horsepower was lowered to 245. The downward spiral of the 454c.i.horsepower continued as the LS-4 version produced 275 hp and 468 lb.-ft torque. Again, this was a drop by five hp and ten lb.-ft from the previous year. 

1974 was the last production year of the 454 in the Corvette, although it was still offered in the Chevelle in the first six months of 1975. This engine was also available in full-size Impala/Caprice until 1976. 

The slightly rough idle of 454 big block Chevy.

L19 

This was another version of the 454 engine known as EFI and was introduced in 1987 with a switched carburetor to fuel injection. L19 engine was used in C/K 3500 and GM C 1500 SS trucks. It produced 255 hp and 405 lb.-ft of torque. 

Generation V 

This engine came with many design improvements when it was introduced in 1991. Some of its features included new oiling passages closer to the camshaft, an advanced one-piece rear seal, and four-bolt mains on all blocks. In addition, the valve train was no longer adjustable, and GM eliminated the provision for a mechanical fuel pump.

The front of this block has extruding bosses for the water pump, and it also has aluminum valve covers and front accessory mounting. This engine is available in a variety of versions. 

6.0 (L50, 4.00 In x 3.62 In)

This 366c.i.(6.0L) engine received Mark V (1991) updates for use in medium-duty pickup trucks and school buses. A good example was the GMC Sierra 3500 and Silverado 2500 pickup trucks. This engine has a cast-iron block and aluminum cylinder heads with a maximum displacement of 6.0L and a compression ratio of 9.4:1. The bore and stroke are 4.0 inches x 3.62 inches, and it can produce 300 horsepower @ 4400 RPM and 360 lb.-ft    max torque @ 4000 RPM. 

L19 

The L19 is an updated 454c.i. motor based on the gen V block, heads, and crankshaft. It has a rated net horsepower of 230 and 380 lb.-ft of torque. However, it was discontinued in 1995 as GM replaced it with the Vortec 7400 in 1996. 

502 (8.2L, 4.466 In x 4.00 In)

The 502 features a total displacement of 501.28c.i. (8.2L).
Credit: commons.wikimedia.org

The 502 features a total displacement of 501.28c.i. (8.2L). This motor had a cast-iron 4-bolt main block with a 4.466 x 4 inches bore and stroke. Besides, GM offered this engine in multiple crate motors. However, it was more of a workhorse for fleet vehicles like vans and large trucks. 

The 502 engine had horsepower ratings between 338 and 600 hp and torque of 470 lb.-ft to 567 lb.-ft. 

 Big Block 502 CI Chevy Camaro overview.

ZZ572 (9.4L, 4.56 In x 4.375 In)

ZZ572 is also known as the King Rat since it’s a 502c.i. engine block that has been bored out to 572c.i.displacement. It has a 12:1 compression ratio, 4.56-inch bore, and 4.375-inch stroke. This engine produces 620 horsepower and can reach 650 lb.-ft torque. 

Still, the ZZ572 is available in a high-compression variant (ZZ572/720R) with a minimum horsepower of 720 and 680 lb.-ft torque on high octane. The engine is available in the 2022 COPO Camaro as a 572 engine with 9.4L displacement. 

ZZ632 (10.4L, 4.60 In x 4.75 In)

The ZZ632 engine is the most prominent and most-powerful crate engine in GM’s history. This V8 engine is naturally-aspirated and is capable of producing 1,004 horsepower and 876 lb.-ft of torque. As the largest crate engine that GM has ever built, the ZZ632 is the king of performance since it can reach peak power at 6,600 RPM and can rev to a maximum of 7,000 RPM. 

This model’s CNC-machined high-flow aluminum cylinder heads feature symmetric ports. What’s more, all eight intake ports are equal in length, volume, and layout. Therefore, the individual cylinders produce similar power. 

Generation VI

GM produced this engine between 1966 and 2001. Motors in this family feature hydraulic lifters with multi-port fuel injection. They have a six-bolt aluminum timing chain cover, unlike ten bolts on older blocks. 

Vortec 7400 (L29) 7.4L, 4.24 In x 3.99 In)

The Vortec 7400 (L29) is based on the 1995 7.4L 454c.i.engine. Its horsepower increased by 60 hp for use in GM’s trucks to produce 290 hp @ 4,000 RPM and 410 lb.-ft torque @ 3,200 RPM. This engine has 4.24 inches x 3.99 inches bore and stroke. In addition, its valve train has an overhead valve configuration with two valves per cylinder. 

The Vortec 7400 (L29) was produced for five years, appearing in 1996 – 2000 Chevrolet/GMC 2500 and 3500 trucks and 1996 – 1999 Chevrolet Suburban 2500/GMC Suburban 2500, among others. 

Vortec 7400 (L21) 7.4L, 4.24 In x 3.99 In)

The Vortec 7400 was much like the 7400 (L29), except it had different PCM, forged crankshaft, and pistons, and the coil was closer to the ignition. Because of these features, GM used this engine in commercial vehicles. Thus, it powered 1998 – 2001 Chevrolet Kodiak/GMC and 1998 – 2001 Kodiak/Topkick. 

Generation VII

Vortec 8100 (L18) (8.1L, 4.25 In x 4.37 In)

The Vortec 8100 was introduced in 2001 and came with many significant changes. It has a new firing order (1-8-7-6-5-4-3), an electronic fuel injection system, and a new 18-bolt head bolt pattern. GM built the Vortec 8100 (L18) for motor homes, trucks, boats, and industrial use. 

This motor is based on the 454 CID engine featuring a 4.25-inch bore and a 4.37-inch stroke. It boasts 496c.i.displacement and is rated between 320 and 340 horsepower and 440 to 455 lb.-ft torque. This model has an all-iron engine block with two valves per cylinder. 

General Motors 90° V6 Engines Specs and Sizes 

General Motors produced the 90° V6 Engine between 1978 and 2013.
Credit: wikipedia.org

V6 engines are the humblest engines, often underestimated in their performance and configuration. General Motors produced the 90° V6 Engine between 1978 and 2013. The phaseout of these engines marked the end of an era for the small-block engine.

Let’s again go through each of the families in this line of engines. 

90° V6
Engine Code
YearsDisplacement
c.i.(cc)
Bore x Stroke
in mm
Power HP (kW)TorqueCompression
Ratio
Block and heads
(Iron or Alumium)
3.3L (200CID)1979 - 1981200 c.i.88.9 mm × 88.4 mm95 hp (71kW)
94 hp (70 kW)
160 lb.-ft
154 lb.-ft
8.2:1Iron
3.8L (229 CID)1980 - 1984229 c.i.94.9 mm × 88.4 mm115 hp (86 kW
110 hp (82 kW)
175 - 190 lb.-ft
8.6:1Iron
4.3L (262 CID)1985 - 2022262 c.i.101.6 mm × 88.4 mm155 hp (116 kW)230 lb.-ft 9.3:1Iron
LB11985 - 1995262 c.i.101.6 mm × 88.4 mm155 hp (116 kW)230 lb.-ft 9.3:1Iron
LB41985 - 1995262 c.i.101.6 mm × 88.4 mm130 - 165 hp (97 - 123 kW)210 - 235 lb.-ft9.3:1
8.6:1
9.1:1
Iron
LU21990 - 1991262 c.i.101.6 mm × 88.4 mm170 hp (127 kW) 225 lb.-ft9.1:1Iron
L35 CPI1992 - 1995262 c.i.101.6 mm × 88.4 mm200 hp (149 kW)
190 hp (142 kW)
191 hp (142 kW)
195 hp (145 kW)
260 lb.-ft @ 3600 RPM
360lb.-ft @ 3400 RPM
9.1:1Iron
L35 and LF6 SCPI and MPFI1996 - 2002262 c.i.101.6 mm × 88.4 mm170 - 200 hp (127 - 149 kW)235 - 260 lb.-ft9.2:1Iron
LU3 and LG3 MPFI2003 - 2014262 c.i.101.6 mm × 88.4 mm180 - 200 hp (134 - 149 kW)245 - 260 lb.-ft9.2:1Iron
Turbocharged LB4 4.3L V61991 - 1993262 c.i.101.6 mm × 88.4 mm280 hp (209 kW)360 lb.-ft8.35:1Iron
LV32013 - 2022262.5 c.i.99.6 mm x 92 mm285 hp (213 kW305 lb⋅ft11.0:1Aluminum

Download the full comparison chart here

Generation I

These engines had a V-block with 12 valves. Furthermore, a pushrod valvetrain activated the valves. Although it is based on the small-block Chevy, it does not have the #3 and #6 cylinders. Nonetheless, it has 4.4-inch bore spacing and a 9.025-inch deck height similar to the V8. 

3.3L (200CID) (3.50 In x 3.48 In)

The 3.3L featured a 3.5-inch x 3.48-inch bore and stroke.
Credit: commons.wikimedia.org

The 3.3L (200CID) was used between 1979 and 1981. It replaced the 250c.i.(4.1L) to be used as Chevrolet’s base engine in its downsized line. This model featured a 3.5-inch x 3.48-inch bore and stroke. Its horsepower rating is 95hp @ 3,800 RPM and 160 lb.-ft torque @ 2,000 RPM in 1978 and 94 hp @ 4,000 RPM and 154 lb.-ft torque @ 2,000 RPM. 

Still, the 3.3L (200CID) used 2.45-inch main bearings and 2.1-inch rod bearings. The crankshaft features connecting rod throws offset by 18 degrees to eliminate rough running. Furthermore, this engine was available with a 2-barrel carburetor with the Rochester 2GC carburetor. Later in 1979, it used the Rochester Dualjet carburetor.

3.8L (229 CID) (3.736 In x 3.48 In)

The 3.8L (229 CID) is designed conservatively with a wider 3.736-inch bore and 3.48-inch stroke.
Credit: commons.wikimedia.org

The 3.8L (229 CID) is designed conservatively with a wider 3.736-inch bore and 3.48-inch stroke. Although it is not the highest performer, it is a solid engine that produced 115 hp @ 4,000 RPM and 175 lb.-ft torque @ 2,000 RPM. Nonetheless, it still has a 2.45-inch main bearing and 2.1-inch rod bearing diameters. 

This engine also uses the same crankshaft as the 200c.i. with the same 5.7-inch connecting rods. The intake and exhaust valves came in at 1.84 inches and 1.5 inches, respectively. 

4.3L (262 CID) (4.40 In x 3.48 In)

Although not many people build V6 engines, you’ll be happy to know that the 4.3L (262 CID) is the most successful 90-degree V6. Hence it is more sophisticated with a 4-inch x 3.48 -inch bore and stroke. Besides, it is a true even fire engine where the crankshaft has 30-degree offsets between each rod pin. 

The 4.3L engine was first introduced in 1986 with 155 horsepower and a displacement of 262.3c.i. Besides, it was based on the 350ci. 5.7L V8 engine that was used in passenger cars and later in trucks in 1991. In 1992, GM modified the block even further to allow the installation of a balance shaft through the center of the lifter valley. 

The 4.3L (262) was still in production in 2013, except it had a coil-on-plug ignition system instead of a distributor. Because of this feature, the 4.3L (262) was incompatible with the LU3/L35 since it had a wider bottom flange on its timing cover. Only GM light-duty trucks and vans featured the 262c.i.by 2013. 

The last 4.3L (262 CID) debuted in 2014. 

LB1 and LB4 (1985 – 1995)

The LB1 was first rated at 155 hp and 230 lb.-ft torque, and it was used in GMC and Chevrolet full-size pickups and vans. It featured a Quadrajet 4-barrel carburetor and was referred to as Vortec and continues to be used in 4.3L V6 trucks and vans today. 

The LB4, on the other hand, featured throttle-body fuel injection. It was rated at 130 hp and was used in the Chevrolet Caprice, Chevrolet El Camino, Chevrolet Monte Carlo, and other full-size cars. 

 In 1986, the LB4 hp increased to 140 hp when it was used in the Chevrolet Caprice and El Camino. From 1987, LB4 engines had 160 hp for pickups and 150 hp in full-size vans, and it continued with minor changes in horsepower until 1995 when its production ended. 

LU2 (1990 – 1991)

LU2 was a high-output 4.3L, 262c.i.option. It was for GMC Safari vans and Chevrolet Astro. This model had 170 hp and 225 lb.-ft torque. Further, it had hypereutectic, strutless pistons and an aggressive camshaft. 

L35 CPI (1992 – 1995)

The L35 CPI features a Central Port Fuel-Injection System (CPI), and one centrally-located fuel injector distributes fuel to the six hoses. Each hose has a poppet valve to each intake port, allowing multipoint fuel injection. Even more, the engine had a two-piece cast aluminum with a dual-plenum manifold and was a fire batch set up. 

The L35 was produced between 1992 and 1995 with 195 – 200 hp and 260 lb.-ft torque horsepower. The L35’s cylinder block was redesigned to take on a balance shaft. In addition, it had a thicker timing cover in the 1995 versions. Meanwhile, some L35 with a balance shaft also had a six-bolt timing cover. Lastly, others had a crankshaft position sensor upon the introduction of OBDII. 

L35 and LF6 SCPI and MPFI (1996 – 2002)

These engines were manufactured from 1996 through 2002. Both engines had redesigned heads called Vortecs to improve combustion and airflow. Instead of two freeze plugs, these engines had structural enhancing ribs. They also had an alloy oil pan for the S10 and a cast-aluminum pan for 1996+ models with 12 bolts. 

L35 and LF6 SCPI and MPFI also came with a redesigned 4L60-E transmission and a removable bell housing. The 1999 model year had crankshafts with a 1.4-inch pilot hole depth alongside the LSx-based 4L60E. 

To this end, the L56 is rated at 175 – 180 hp, while the L35 is rated at 180 – 200 hp. Further, the LF6 was used in the S-Series pickups, while the L35 was used in full-size trucks and vans. 

LU3 and LG3 MPFI

The LU3 features Vortec heads and is a Sports Utility engine based on the 350 5.7L Chevy small-block engine. This motor uses cast-iron block and heads with 4-inch x 3.48-inch bore and stroke. This engine’s power output is 195 hp to 200 hp and 250 to 260 lb.-ft torque. 

The LG3 was produced in 2003 and was used in GMC S-Series and Chevrolet pickups. It was rated at 180 hp and 245 lb.-ft torque. Besides, both engines have a multipoint fuel injection system featuring six Multec II fuel injectors on each intake port. The LG3 had a cast-iron lower intake and a cast aluminum upper intake. 

Still, the LU3 also had a quiet cam to reduce vibration at idle and high engine speeds. 

Turbocharged LB4 4.3L V6 (1991 – 1993)

The LB4 4.3L V6 originally debuted in 1985 with a reconfigured firing order to smooth the engine’s idle. The engine was used in the 1991 GMC Syclone, a limited edition. The Turbocharged LB4 used electronic multipoint fuel injection, Garret water/air cooler, and a Mitsubishi TD06-17C turbocharger. 

Other internal upgrades of this engine include hypereutectic pistons, graphite-composite head gaskets, nodular iron main bearing caps, and stainless-steel flanges. The turbocharged LB4 could produce 280 hp and 360 lb.-ft of torque @ 3,600 RPM. 

Generation V 

4.3L (262 CID) (3.92 In x 3.62 In)

This motor is the new standard 4.3L V6 engine. Its model year is 2014, and it’s based on the Gen V LT1 small-block V8. Even more, its large displacement is perfect for the 2014 Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra. Additionally, the engine has an aluminum block and heads, completely different from its previous cast-iron block and head models. This engine is also available for marine and industrial applications. 

LV3 

The LV3 is a 2014 V6 engine model. It is redesigned to have a 2-valve pushrod valvetrain, 4.4-inch bore centers, and a 90-degree cylinder angle. This engine was based on the 5th gen V LT engine, so it had similar features such as piston cooling jets, variable displacement oil pump, and direct injection. 

This motor has an aluminum block and heads. It is SAE-certified to 285 hp @ 5300 RPM and 305 lb.-ft at @ 3900 RPM when using regular unleaded gasoline. The LV3 can reach 297 hp @ 5300 RPM and 305 lb.-ft torque @ 3,900 RPM on E85. 

Summary 

Small-block Chevy and 90° V6 Chevy engines are remarkably smaller than big-block Chevy engines. Thus, they are suitable for various car types, but big-block Chevy models are for performance vehicles and trucks. Looking at their specs, you can see that these are the most significant automotive engines designed by GM, thanks to their power and longevity. 

Now, I hope you can tell their differences by going through this Chevy engines specs and sizes column. 

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